Baucom Institute Awarded 2013 Kansas Minority-Owned Professional Service Firm of the Year

Kansas minority award 2013

The Baucom Institute for Longevity & Life Enhancement has received the 2013 Kansas Minority-Owned Professional Service Firm of the Year Award from the Kansas Department of Commerce Office of Minority and Women Business Development.

Dr. Karan Baucom accepted the honor at the annual Minority Enterprise Development Week luncheon, Oct. 8, 2013, in Topeka, Kansas. The Baucom Institute was selected for the award based on business leadership, company culture, community impact, sustained growth, and dedication to ethical business practices.Kansas Minority Group Award Pic 2013

The event recognized 13 companies and three individuals for their support of Kansas minority and women-owned businesses and their efforts to create opportunities. The luncheon took place during Kansas Minority Enterprise Development (MED) Week, the Department’s annual celebration of minority and women entrepreneurs in Kansas.

“Minority and women-owned businesses make critical contributions to the Kansas economy as innovators, entrepreneurs and job creators,” Kansas Commerce Secretary Pat George said. “Minority Enterprise Development Week provides us with a great way to honor these businesses and individuals for everything that they do to make Kansas a wonderful place to live and work.”

Congratulations to Dr. Baucom and Manager, Nancy Gardner, and the staff for their continued success with The Baucom Institute.

Intestinal Health – the Four “R” Program: Part III – Fungi

3.1.4_fungi_2In Part I of our four-part series, we looked at the gut and how bacteria plays a part in a good way and a bad one as well as the treatment for it – the Four R Program - four steps to creating a healthy gut:  Remove, Replace, Reinoculate, Repair. In Part II, we looked at bacteria specifically in relation to our gut health and what it does to create havoc in our system, not just our gut. In Part III, we’ll look at yeast and fungi in relation to the gut and the treatment options that are available to deal with these two gut busters.

What is it?

Fungus is an onomatopoeia word – it sounds like what it is: not very desirable. Fungi commonly identified species are: Candida, Rhodotorula, Geotrichum, Sacchoromyces, and Trichosporon. Some types of fungus you might be familiar with are mushrooms and yeast.

Although yeast is a normal inhabitant of the gastrointestinal flora and is present in 40-65% of the human population with no harmful effects, if overgrown it is the most common causal agent of opportunistic fungal infections. Contrary to what you might think, the esophagus is the most commonly infected site followed by the stomach then the small and large bowel.

What are the symptoms?

The symptoms of a fungal infection include: gastric pain, nausea, vomiting, gas, and bloating.

What are the treatment options?GP2103

  • Reduce any intake of refined carbohydrates and sugars
  • Use herbal agents in combination oregano oil, berberine, goldenseal, grapefruit seed extract, and garlic
  • Consult a physician for medication
  • Use S. boulardii which aids in the growth of beneficial bacteria; crowds out the yeast and supports the immune system
  • Avoid fructooligosaccharide (FOS) which may feed yeast

At The Baucom Institute, we do a full testing workup to determine the type of infection and then would treat accordingly.

Do any of these symptoms sound familiar? If you are in the medical field, how do you handle these infections?

Intestinal Health – the Four “R” Program: Part II – Bacteria

bacteria

In Part I of our four-part series, we looked at the gut and how bacteria plays a part in a good way and a bad one. We also presented that there are four steps to creating a healthy gut:  Remove, Replace, Reinoculate, Repair.

In Part II, we’ll look at bacteria specifically in relation to our gut health and what it does to create havoc in our system, not just our gut.

Opportunistic and pathogenic bacteria proliferate in our body, specifically our GI tract, because of our own behavior, namely poor diet; antibiotic use; as well as contaminated animal food sources, water and produce. That being said, it is within reason that the infection can be reversed.

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http://www.thelifetree.com/amoeba.htm

The symptoms of this invasion present themselves as acute gastritis with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, cramping, fever, diarrhea, even influenza-like symptoms are common, including headache and malaise, and sometimes resulting in as bad as bloody diarrhea, colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome.

As bad as it sounds, there is treatment for bacterial infection: probiotics, prebiotics, vitamins, herbal agents such as goldenseal, citrus seed extract, garlic, oregano oil, and olive leaf extract. At the very least, be sure and rehydrate if you have had any diarrhea.

At Baucom Institute, we deal especially with the gut and treatment of these types of issues. In more invasive cases, we specialize in prescribing medications to deal with the serious nature of these issues.

Do you have any of these symptoms or know anyone who does?

 

Gut Health – Parasites

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As we are discussing gut health, what do you consider important to dialogue about in regard to parasites? Regarding Botanical Treatment – what are some of the herbs you would consider using for parasitical infection of the gut? What would you use for Entamoeba Histoliytica? Would you treat people who are asymptomatic and why? What about for pinworms? and Giardia Lamblia?